Astronaut Sandra Magnus Cooks In Zero Gravity

Astronauts rely upon food that has been precooked and bundled in a manner that permits them to eat without making a mess. The equivalent was valid for space travelers onboard the International Space Station until at some point in 2008.

NASA astronaut Sandra Magnus joined the team on the station as a part of Expedition 18 out of 2008. Upon boarding, she rolled out some changes to what and how they ate.

How It Started

astronaut sandra magnus cooks in zero gravity

Everything began with a container of Russian chicken with vegetables and added olives, pesto pasta, and sun-dried tomatoes. The result of these combined leaves a piece to be wanted however resembled a refresher. In her extra time, tossing dinners like this around turned into her hobby. To Magnus, food was a significant piece of their mission.

She didn’t have a standard kitchen with the best utensils or ingredients. Subsequently, she depended on what she could track down; a dull folding knife, zip-lock sacks, and conduit tape. At whatever point she hacked vegetables, she utilized a portion of channel tape to ward them from drifting off. She set the pipe tape on the table with its tacky side and unloaded the cut pieces on it. In her diary, she composed:

“This works for everything from trash to onion and garlic peelings and lemon peel.”

Despite the fact that she needed new ingredients like fruits, leafy vegetables, or milk, she actually thought of decent dinners that merited excitement. As shared by her, she prepared with the food lab to get a large portion of what she needed for cooking on board the station.

Vickie Kloeris, the director of ISS food system, said that the space explorers were on a 16-day menu cycle. The menu contained a combination of Russian and American food varieties for ISS. Prior to any mission, every space traveler is required to make choices from a pre-endorsed menu. Every space explorer had the chance to take up additional provisions from their bonus compartment. The only provision was that these additional items should meet the time span of usability necessities of the standard menu thing. Magnus used this.

Cooking In Space – How Long It Takes

Magnus let us realize that cooking on the ISS consumes a large chunk of the day. If she somehow managed to cook onions utilizing the Russian food hotter, it would require as long as four hours to get it cooked right. This clarifies why space explorers don’t do a lot of cooking.

As per NASA transport food administrator Michele Perchonok, it required a ton of time and exertion. Likewise, there is the potential for a mess that can’t be ignored.

For Magnus to get ready garlic, for instance, she prepares well ahead of time to have the perfect measure of oil and garlic onboard. She composes:

“To prepare garlic, and I have added onions to the mix, you keep some of the foil packets that the Russian dehydrated food comes in, put the garlic and chopped onions (large pieces) in the foil, squirt in some olive oil, fold the foil over to fit into the food warmer and turn it on. The warmer only works for 30 minutes or so, so every half hour, you have to come in and turn it on again. After about four or five cycles, you have cooked garlic and onions.”

She even made occasion-themed treats with her crewmates for Christmas. She prepared space salsa with sun-dried tomatoes, breakfast frankfurter joins, adhoc barbecue from heated beans, sliced onions, and a combination of creamed spinach and cream of mushroom soup.

Food Reception

astronaut sandra magnus cooks in zero gravity

During an in-flight talk, she said:

“Whenever I cook, I know the guys enjoy just the different flavors and the different flavor combinations that I came up with.”

Such development is valued. It definitely gave the folks’ taste buds a taste of home.

A Look At Sarah Magnus’ Life Onboard

astronaut sandra magnus cooks in zero gravity

December 1, 2008 – Sandra Magnus, Expedition 18 designer, imagined in the Destiny lab of the ISS, almost a sack of new fruits floating.

astronaut sandra magnus cooks in zero gravity

December 23, 2008 – Sandra Magnus imagined skimming between two Russian Orlan spacesuits with Santa caps in the Harmony hub of the ISS

astronaut sandra magnus cooks in zero gravity

December 25, 2008 – Sandra Magnus seen with Astronauts Michael Fincke (left) and cosmonaut Yury Lonchacov (right) modeling for a photograph in the Zvezda Service Module of the ISS not long before eating a Christmas feast.

astronaut sandra magnus cooks in zero gravity

January 1, 2009 – Astronaut Sandra Magnus envisioned having Tacos she made in space at the kitchen in the Zvezda Service Module of the ISS.

astronaut sandra magnus cooks in zero gravity
astronaut sandra magnus cooks in zero gravity

January 7, 2009 – Sandra Magnus presents with food pockets holding food she made in the Zvezda Service Module of the ISSS.

astronaut sandra magnus cooks in zero gravity

February 1, 2009 – Magnus again seen getting ready to eat a dinner on board the ISS

astronaut sandra magnus cooks in zero gravity

February 3, 2009 – Sandra Magnus and Yury Lonchacov are seen working with food storage containers in the Zvezda Service Module of the ISS

astronaut sandra magnus cooks in zero gravity

Walk 4, 2009 – Sarah Magnus is seen eating a dinner in the Zvezda Service Module of the ISS

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